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Research by Appointment

2020 Programs

There’s always something happening at The Heritage Museum!

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January 2020:

In his new book, local author Scott Suter explores the trials and triumphs of his Rockingham County ancestor Emanuel Suter (1833-1902), who progressively moved his pottery from cottage industry to full-scale industrial enterprise – well before such economic change would characterize the twentieth century. Come hear about Rockingham’s pottery revolution! Book sales and signings are anticipated.

February 2020:

In anticipation of his upcoming biography on the life of Lucy Frances Simms, Dale MacAllister will give an overview of Simms’s life, education, and schools. The program will also explain how the beginnings of public education in Virginia and of women’s suffrage affected her post-emancipation experiences. Book available early April 2020.

Nancy Sorrells will discuss the 1918 Influenza Pandemic, both globally and on the homefronts of Augusta and Rockingham Counties.
When WWI ended on November 11, 1918, 16 million people around the world had perished as a result of the conflict, including 117,000 Americans.
But that staggering number pales in comparison to the second, deadlier event that occurred simultaneously—the influenza pandemic that peaked in the fall of 1918.

That outbreak, which still counts as the deadliest human pandemic in recorded human history, took an estimated 50 million lives. One fifth of the world’s population contracted the virus.

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